Annotated Bibliography Writing Sample

Do you know what can help you in essay riders the most? You will learn a lot of interesting and useful information from the high-quality sample of the annotated bibliography. Don’t hesitate to discover the right format, style, and structure with our Annotated Bibliography Sample. You should use our sample as template for writing the annotated bibliography.

Conflicts between Countries

Get a Perfect Custom Paper Written Personally for You!

100% Original

In Line with Instructions

Unlimited Adjustments

Free Proofreading

Stewart, F. (2002). Root causes of violent conflict in developing countries. BMJ : British Medical Journal324(7333), 342–345.

Some of the factors that predispose countries into war include poverty, political, social and economic inequalities. Wars have a cultural dimension that relates to religion and ethnicity. The economic and social differences prevalent in the western and Muslim societies are indicators of international inequalities. They have resulted to extremists such as Saddam Hussein to mobilize support along religious which trigger violence between states.

To Get Your Essay You Need:

Share Your Requirements

Proceed with the Payment

Check the Draft Sent and Comment It

Review Final Paper

Enjoy Your Perfect Essay!

Humphreys, M. (2003). Economics and violent conflict. Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research, Harvard University, February.

Poverty causes violence. Poverty leads to migration that results into conflicts between the identity groups over resources. Both the growth-oriented and conflict prevention initiatives are essential in the preventing conflicts. Focusing on the development efforts of the developing nations leads to an everlasting conflict resolution whose causes are as a result of poverty. Increased wealth in a country can result in inter-state war. When states get more prosperous, there is a tendency of them looking for conquests abroad to fuel their economies.

Humphreys, M. (2005). Natural resources, conflict, and conflict resolution. Journal of conflict resolution49(4), 508-537.

The competition over the natural resources has the potential of leading to, intensifying or sustaining violence. Conflict over natural resources exacerbates a broader struggle over political, economic, cultural and religious issues across the borders. Examples of such resources include land, waters, oil and gas and minerals among others which tend to have a lot of economic value to a country. Developing a nation requires natural resources as their primary source of income and also to have their nationals depend on them for their livelihoods. The existence of such resources within the territorial borders has the potential of triggering conflicts as nations try to extend their boundaries so that they can own them.

Alesina, A., & Spolaore, E. (2006). Conflict, defense spending, and the number of nations. European Economic Review50(1), 91-120.

Trade relationship or conflicting interests between countries can trigger conflicts based on natural resources and economic and non-economic issues. Conflict can also stem following a break-up of countries. Conflicts between the smaller states can heighten because of the breakup of the larger countries. However, the process adopted during a break up between countries dictates the amount of spending on defense by the involved countries.

Douma, P., Frerks, G., & Goor, L. V. (1998). Research project: Causes of conflict in the Third World. Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations.

Some conflicts between countries surround the political problem of establishing or sustaining states in multi-ethnic, religious and cultural societies. The governments are now becoming partisan in some sectors and groups of societies while at the same time repressing other groups. Lack of institutional capacities is a primary cause of conflicts. In general, conflicts have multi-dimensional reasons and involve several actors. However, the political dimension is a significant contributor to violence. They, therefore, require approaching them in different levels and interventions.

Toset, H. P. W., Gleditsch, N. P., & Hegre, H. (2000). Shared rivers and interstate conflict. Political Geography19(8), 971-996.

The major rivers that cross regional boundaries have the potential of causing the upstream-downstream conflicts. Water plays a vital role in economic lives of people of countries, and their competition can exacerbate conflict and contribute to interstate violence. Joint rivers increase incidences of militarized disputes and armed conflict. Water scarcity also results in the conflict between interstates.

Barbieri, K. (1996). Economic interdependence: A path to peace or a source of interstate conflict? Journal of Peace Research33(1), 29-49.

The expansion of interstate linkage stimulates further cooperation in other areas and thus promoting peace. They improve communication, eliminate misunderstanding and further fosters cultural and institutional approaches that mediate conflict of interest which may arise. One of the linkages is through trade relations. The associated benefits allow the rational leaders to change their behaviors as they try to maximize the social welfare of their people.

Barquet, K., Lujala, P., & Rød, J. K. (2014). Transboundary conservation and militarized interstate disputes. Political Geography42, 1-11.

The nations that have engaged in militarized disputes can quickly establish the transboundary protected areas that can act as a source of cooperation. Starting negotiation channels centered on environmental issues is a milestone in the promotion and reinforcement of harmonious relations between conflicting states. In Africa, Middle East, and Asia for example, transboundary protected areas facilitate peaceful co-existence.

Gibler, D. M. (2017). What they fight for: Specific territorial issues in militarized interstate disputes, 1816–2001. Conflict Management and Peace Science34(2), 194-211.

There are several classifications for border conflicts some of which include disputed ownership, opportunity-based conflict, general border issues, border violations, changes in state systems, and fishing rights. The variation across the types of territorial disputes concentrate on fighting over bordering territories that have disputed ownership claims.

Kelman, H. C. (2005). Building trust among enemies: The central challenge for international conflict resolution. International journal of intercultural relations29(6), 639-650.

The gradual building of trust among enemies is essential establishing peace because no part can enter into peace process without mutual trust. They can also not come into building trust without elements of peace and thus introducing a dilemma. The movement toward peace is a process that involves successive approximations where the level of commitment improves the level of reassurance.

References

Alesina, A., & Spolaore, E. (2006). Conflict, defense spending, and the number of nations. European Economic Review50(1), 91-120.

Barbieri, K. (1996). Economic interdependence: A path to peace or a source of interstate conflict? Journal of Peace Research33(1), 29-49.

Barquet, K., Lujala, P., & Rød, J. K. (2014). Transboundary conservation and militarized interstate disputes. Political Geography42, 1-11.

Douma, P., Frerks, G., & Goor, L. V. (1998). Research project: Causes of conflict in the Third World. Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations.

Humphreys, M. (2003). Economics and violent conflict. Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research, Harvard University, February.

Gibler, D. M. (2017). What they fight for: Specific territorial issues in militarized interstate disputes, 1816–2001. Conflict Management and Peace Science34(2), 194-211.

Humphreys, M. (2005). Natural resources, conflict, and conflict resolution. Journal of conflict resolution49(4), 508-537.

Kelman, H. C. (2005). Building trust among enemies: The central challenge for international conflict resolution. International journal of intercultural relations29(6), 639-650.

Stewart, F. (2002). Root causes of violent conflict in developing countries. BMJ : British Medical Journal324(7333), 342–345.

Toset, H. P. W., Gleditsch, N. P., & Hegre, H. (2000). Shared rivers and interstate conflict. Political Geography19(8), 971-996.

Type of work:
Number of Pages:

Turnaround/Level Undergraduate Master PhD
14 days USD 14.36
USD 17.96
USD 15.96
USD 19.95
USD 19.15
USD 23.94
7 days USD 17.24
USD 21.55
USD 19.15
USD 23.94
USD 22.98
USD 28.73
5 days USD 20.11
USD 25.14
USD 22.34
USD 27.93
USD 26.81
USD 33.52
3 days USD 22.98
USD 28.73
USD 25.54
USD 31.92
USD 30.64
USD 38.30
48 hours USD 25.86
USD 32.32
USD 28.73
USD 35.91
USD 34.47
USD 43.09
36 hours USD 31.60
USD 39.50
USD 35.11
USD 43.89
USD 42.13
USD 52.67
24 hours USD 35.91
USD 44.89
USD 39.90
USD 49.88
USD 47.88
USD 59.85
12 hours USD 43.09
USD 53.87
USD 47.88
USD 59.85
USD 57.46
USD 71.82
8 hours USD 50.27
USD 62.84
USD 55.86
USD 69.83
USD 67.03
USD 83.79

Comments are closed.